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Research & Initiatives

The State Government is supporting a variety of research projects and initiatives to gain a better understanding of shark biology and ecology by implementing (and investigating) various public safety initiatives and making changes to government policy. The aim is to provide everyone with useful information to make informed decisions about their water use.

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Research Reports

Research Reports

29 September 2016

Research is a crucial element of the Western Australian Government’s shark hazard mitigation strategy. The following research reports have been published as the Government and its partners continue to investigate ways to enhance and expand existing shark hazard mitigation measures. 

 

Review of potential fisheries and marine management impacts on the south-western Australian white shark population, September 2016

The objective of the study was to reconstruct the levels of annual catch of white sharks by commercial and recreational fishing since 1938 and to combine this data with life-history information to develop a series of population trajectory scenarios. These scenarios varied markedly and the report has identified the need for further investigation. 

View Fisheries Research Report No. 277

 

How close is too close? The effect of a non-lethal electric shark deterrent on white shark behaviour, July 2016

Researchers at the University of Western Australia conducted a study to examine the effectiveness of the Shark Shield Freedom 7TM shark deterrent.

The study found that the Shark Shield Freedom 7TM produced an effective deterrent field an average of 1.3 metres from the device’s electrodes. It was found to prevent white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) from interacting with a static bait 10 out of 10 times on their first approach.

It was only after subsequent approaches that the rate dropped slightly to 9 out of 10 times, showing signs of habituation to the Shark Shield Freedom 7TM, which decreased the effectiveness of the deterrent field by an average of 12 centimetres per approach by the same shark.  However, despite an increase in tolerance, white sharks continued to be deterred from biting or interacting with the bait if an active Shark Shield Freedom 7TM was present.

View report

 

Evaluation of passive acoustic telemetry approaches for monitoring and mitigating shark hazards off the coast of Western Australia, March 2016

A seven-year shark monitoring research program recorded data on white shark activity off the Western Australian coast. The project recorded nearly 180,000 shark detections by receivers from Ningaloo to Esperance. More than 22,000 of those detections were from 64 tagged white sharks.

The report showed the movements of white sharks were mostly uncoordinated which makes it hard to predict when humans might encounter them. 

View Fisheries Research Report No. 273

 

Review of the Dunsborough Beach Enclosure Trial, September 2014 

The Western Australian Government funded a trial of a beach enclosure at Old Dunsborough between January and April 2014. The trial tested the suitability of beach enclosures in protecting swimmers from sharks. The enclosure extended about 100m from shore and ran parallel with the beach for approximately 300m.

A review of the Old Dunsborough beach enclosure trial by Hydrobiology found that it was successful, providing a cost effective option for a protected swimming area with no environmental impact. The review also assessed the suitability of other beaches for the deployment of beach enclosures. 

View report

 

A correlation study of the potential risk factors associated with white shark attacks in Western Australian waters, November 2012

A correlation study was conducted into the potential risk factors associated with white shark attacks in Western Australian waters. The report explores possible links between shark sightings, interactions or attacks and locations, weather conditions, water temperatures and the activity of other marine mammals that might attract sharks. 

View Fisheries Occasional Publication 109

 

Likely effectiveness of netting or other capture programs as a shark hazard mitigation strategy in Western Australia, August 2012.

A beach netting study was commissioned to review the effectiveness of shark meshing, and shark exclusion barriers implemented in other areas of the world and the likelihood of these initiatives being successful in Western Australia. The study was conducted by Queensland’s Bond University. 

The report found that shark nets and drum lines were not recommended. Instead beach enclosures (referred to as shark enclosures) provide a complete physical barrier that prevent sharks entering an area without killing the sharks or other marine life. 

View Fisheries Occasional Publication 108

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